Strength

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Strength

Title Strength Training
Scripture He gives strength to the weary and increases the power of the weak. Even youths grow tired and weary, and young men stumble and fall; butthose who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint. Isaiah 40: 29-31
Objectives

(3-5)

Why strength training is important.

How much you need.

Strength training options by large muscle group.

Difference between body building and strength training

Difference between physique of young men and young women.

Materials Needed Dumbells, resistance bands, bodyweight, chair or bench
Outline
Lecture

(15-25 minutes)

Most of us know that strength training (with free weights, weight machines, or resistance bands) can help build and maintain muscle mass and strength. What many of us don’t know is that strong muscles lead to strong bones. And strong bones can help minimize the risk of fracture due to osteoporosis.

A combination of age-related changes, inactivity, and inadequate nutrition conspire to gradually steal bone mass, at the rate of 1% per year after age 40. As bones grow more fragile and susceptible to fracture, they are more likely to break after even a minor fall or a far less obvious stress, such as bending over to tie a shoelace.

Osteoporosis should be a concern for all of us. An estimated eight million women and two million men in the United States have osteoporosis. It is now responsible for more than two million fractures each year, and experts expect that number will rise. Hip fractures are usually the most serious. Six out of 10 people who break a hip never fully regain their former level of independence. Even walking across a room without help may become impossible.

Numerous studies have shown that strength training can play a role in slowing bone loss, and several show it can even build bone. This is tremendously useful to help offset age-related declines in bone mass. Activities that put stress on bones can nudge bone-forming cells into action. That stress comes from the tugging and pushing on bone that occur during strength training (as well as weight-bearing aerobic exercises like walking or running). The result is stronger, denser bones.

And strength training, in particular, has bone benefits beyond those offered by aerobic weight-bearing exercise. It targets bones of the hips, spine, and wrists, which are the sites most likely to fracture. What’s more, resistance workouts — particularly those that include moves emphasizing power and balance — enhance strength and stability. That can boost confidence, encourage you to stay active, and reduce fractures another way — by cutting down on falls.

Activity 3 Sets of 20 in a circuit

Chest Press (w/DB) – scale weight based on strength

Push Ups

Tricep dips w/bench or chair

Bicep Hammer Curls

Bodyweight squats (DB optional)

Duckwalk with Resistance bands

Calf Raises (DB optional)

 

Let’s do it

☐ Yes, there could be an advanced level portfolio assignment with this lesson?

 

 

 

 

If Yes, explain the advanced assignment.

Mentor Debrief
Reference Material https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/strength-training-builds-more-than-muscles
Developer & Short Bio Tarena Terry
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